Funko Friday: Batman

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It’s Friday night, and here at The No Seatbelt Blog, I celebrate it by writing about toys. Because that’s what nerds do. Every week, I showcase another piece of my collection of Funko’s Pop! vinyl figures, offering some background on the featured character, its origin, and significance to me. Funko has won a piece of my nerdy heart with this line of compact, inexpensive, big-headed collectibles, and my collection of them has grown exponentially over the last few years. Continue reading

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Film Analysis: Memento

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The concepts of story and plot may have similar connotations, but when it comes to filmmaking, they are two different elements. In the context of the world created by a given film, the story is all-encompassing – it consists of the explicit events presented, as well as everything that the viewer can infer that is not explicitly shown or told by the narrative. Conversely, the plot of a film is comprised of actions and events that are deliberately chosen by the filmmaker in order to convey messages and manipulate the audience. Christopher Nolan’s 2000 film Memento manipulates the viewer by telling through narration a story which may or not be true, and carefully selecting what it actually shows on screen as part of the plot. Continue reading

Funko Friday: Bane

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I picked up this Funko Pop! Doll that resembles the marble-mouthed villain from The Dark Knight Rises in a shop on the boardwalk in either Ocean City or Wildwood, New Jersey. I got him for about ten bucks, and not long after that, Funko discontinued it, sending its value skywards. I’ve seen him going for as much as $230 on Ebay and Amazon. I’ve been tempted to sell him, but I think I’ll hold onto him for a few more years or until someone gives me an answer I can’t refuse. For toy collectors, the Funko train is a great one to be on, since the Pop! dolls are very inexpensive, and when they are retired, their sale value often goes through the roof, assuming you can overcome whatever sentimental value is attached to the character.  Continue reading