Mini Movie Reviews: No Escape

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When I first saw the trailer for No Escape, I was intrigued enough to say “That’ll be one for RedBox,” and that’s precisely how I’m watching it as I write this. An action movie set on foreign soil, featuring Owen Wilson as the unlikely hero admittedly comes from more than a little out of left field, but I was still drawn to it. I rented the movie thinking it was going to be one of those turn-your-brain-off, over-the-top action flicks with a clear protagonist and villain, but it was more complex and actually packed a heavy message.  Continue reading

Mini Movie Reviews: Jason Bourne

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Jason Bourne is back. It’s been nearly a decade since Matt Damon played the title role in this incredible thriller series, and it’s more than safe to say he hasn’t lost his touch. Damon takes up the mantle again in Jason Bourne, as his character, a former assassin for the U.S. government lives on the run while the secretive government agency that made him what he was tries to bring him back in, or better yet, kill him. This time, he finds out some more than unpleasant news about who was involved with the program that in the name of patriotism transformed him into a killing machine. That revelation hits entirely too close to home, if you’re picking up what I’m putting down.  Continue reading

Funko Friday: Robocop

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It’s Friday night, and I’m kicking off the weekend with another entry in my weekly toy series, Funko Friday, as I batten down the hatches for the impending blizzard. Tonight, I have chosen Funko’s Pop! vinyl version of Robocop as my subject. The namesake of the obscenely violent 1987 action movie, Robocop was formerly known as Officer Alex J. Murphy, who was shot to pieces by a group of criminals, only to return to the force, half-man, half-machine, to take out the trash on the streets of crime-ridden Detroit.  Continue reading

Film Analysis: The Fugitive

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In the brilliant 1993 thriller The Fugitive, the filmmakers use a variety of techniques to lead the viewer through the story, from dropping hints with color and lighting that viewers are not necessarily trained to consciously notice while they’re watching, to employing a gripping editing style that effectively supports the cat-and-mouse game that embroils the film’s two main characters. Every movie has content, which is what is seen and heard on screen, and what is referred to as form is the way in which the film’s creators manipulate that content to their own ends and present it to the viewer. The filming and production techniques used by the filmmakers of The Fugitive intelligently support the content of the movie, and raise it to a level that exceeds the expectations of the audience for cinematic fare of its type. Continue reading